Joint Preservation Blog

December 14, 2008

Healing Tendon Tears

A tendon is the connection between a muscle and a bone.  It transmits force from the muscle, through a joint to allow movement.  Tendons, like any structure, can be torn or damaged.  Most tears heal, but some need help.  Surgery is an option, but should only be considered when the tendon is completely torn in half and retracted (the two ends don’t come together).  If the tear is not complete, but a partial tear, then surgery may not be needed.  Modern advances in regenerative medicine allow us to undertake healing tendon tears instead of sewing them.  This new 21st century way of healing or repairing a tear in the tendon tear has significant advantages over the older, 20th century surgical methods. 

First, if the tendon is only partially torn, the newer stem cell injection procedure often requires very minimal down time, unlike surgical approaches where the tendon is sewn.  This is because the newer stem cell procedure involves injecting those healing cells directly into the tendon under x-ray guidance.  Without a surgical incision, the area heals more quickly.  Also, the stem cells allow the tendon tear to mend fully.  For more information, see the link above. 

For scientific information on healing tendon tears with adult stem cells, see this link to the National Library of Medicine. 

Older, but still interesting ways of healing tendon tears without surgery include prolotherapy.  Another prolotherapy link here and here.  Prolotherapy is injecting the tendon with a substance to cause a brief, inflammatory healing reaction in the tedon.  This is oftern repeated several times, once every 3-6 weeks.  This works well with smaller tendon tears, in younger patients, who can remain very active.

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